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Enough to eat? : the nutrition film.

  • Morrison, Herbert, 1888-1965.
Date
1936
  • Videos
  • Online

Available online

Licence

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)
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About this work

Description

This film deals with malnutrition in Britain. It focuses on the relationship between income and nutrition and suggests that government schemes can improve the current situation. It shows that people on low incomes are likely to be consuming insufficient nutrients, for instance, not enough calcium or iron and, as a result, are prone to diseases such as rickets and anaemia. The film draws on the work of Prof. Sir Gowland Hopkins (Cambridge University), Sir John Boyd Orr (Director, Rowett Institute) and Dr. George M' Gonigle (Medical Officer of Health for Stockton-on-Tees) all of whom appear in the film. Narrated by Julian Huxley, who is seen stitting behind a desk, the film presents various pieces of evidence to back up the narrative, for instance rats fed on different diets and interviews with working class mothers about their shopping habits . A number of prominent figures appear in the film. Herbert Morrison (Leader of the London County Council) talks about work to improve the diet of people in London, for example, free school dinners, LCC nutrition centres and annual school medical inspections. Lord Astor talks about global malnutrition, appealing to governments to play a role in feeding their populations and advocating increased world trade to maintain world peace.

Publication/Creation

UK : The Gas Light and Coke Company, 1936.

Physical description

1 encoded moving image (21:03 min.) : sound, black and white

Duration

00:21:03

Copyright note

National Grid Archive c/o BFI.

Terms of use

Unrestricted
CC-BY-NC
Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales

Language note

In English

Creator/production credits

Direction by Edgar Anstey, produced for the Gas Industry. Commentary spoken by Julian S. Huxley.

Notes

This video was made from material preserved by the BFI National Archive.

Contents

Segment 1 This film deals with malnutrition in Britain. It focuses on the relationship between income and nutrition and suggests that government schemes can improve the current situation. It shows that people on low incomes are likely to be consuming insufficient nutrients, for instance, not enough calcium or iron and, as a result, are prone to diseases such as rickets and anaemia. The film draws on the work of Prof. Sir Gowland Hopkins (Cambridge University), Sir John Boyd Orr (Director, Rowett Institute) and Dr. George M' Gonigle (Medical Officer of Health for Stockton-on-Tees) all of whom appear in the film. Narrated by Julian Huxley, who is seen stitting behind a desk, the film presents various pieces of evidence to back up the narrative, for instance rats fed on different diets and interviews with working class mothers about their shopping habits . A number of prominent figures appear in the film. Herbert Morrison (Leader of the London County Council) talks about work to improve the diet of people in London, for example, free school dinners, LCC nutrition centres and annual school medical inspections. Lord Astor talks about global malnutrition, appealing to governments to play a role in feeding their populations and advocating increased world trade to maintain world peace. Time start: 00:00:00:00 Time end: 00:21:03:00 Length: 00:21:03:00

Type/Technique

Languages

  • English


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