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A hypochondriac patient consulting a cynical physician: the patient is healthy, but the physician will provide a treatment that will produce some symptoms of ill-health. Pen drawing, 183-(?).

Date
[between 1830 and 1839?]
Reference
585025i
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view A hypochondriac patient consulting a cynical physician: the patient is healthy, but the physician will provide a treatment that will produce some symptoms of ill-health. Pen drawing, 183-(?).

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Credit: A hypochondriac patient consulting a cynical physician: the patient is healthy, but the physician will provide a treatment that will produce some symptoms of ill-health. Pen drawing, 183-(?). Wellcome Collection. Public Domain Mark

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About this work

Description

The physician is an eighteenth-century type, with a wig and cane, such as the author of this drawing may have witnessed when young: he takes the patient's pulse. The patient resembles Tenniel's drawing of the Red Queen in Alice in Wonderland (possibly both drawing from the same source). The remarks spoken by the physician and the patient appear (in different wording) in a print with lettering "The family physician" (Wellcome Library catalogue no. 10970i)

Publication/Creation

[between 1830 and 1839?]

Physical description

1 drawing : pen and ink ; image and text 14.5 x 22 cm

Lettering

Patient: "I hardly know Doctor what is the matter with me. I eat well, I drink well, and in fact, I sleep well." Doctor: "Very bad symptoms indeed. I'll give you something that shall take them away."

Creator/production credits

Apparently by an amateur, possibly after a print in the style of 'Pigmy revels' (by G.M. Woodward, ca. 1800). The handwriting appears to be that of an elderly Georgian,whose hand was formed in the eighteenth century, possibly here writing in the 1830s or 1840s

Reference

Wellcome Library no. 585025i

Languages

  • English



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