Find thousands of books, manuscripts, visual materials and unpublished archives from our collections, many of them with free online access.

A country dance in a long hall; the elegance of the couple on the left contrasts with the ridiculous poses of the more rustic figures beyond representing "unidealized" humanity; straight, angular and round shapes. Engraving by William Hogarth, 1753.

  • Hogarth, William, 1697-1764.
Date
5 March 1753
Reference
38384i
  • Pictures
  • Online

Available online

view A country dance in a long hall; the elegance of the couple on the left contrasts with the ridiculous poses of the more rustic figures beyond representing "unidealized" humanity; straight, angular and round shapes. Engraving by William Hogarth, 1753.

Licence

Public Domain Mark
You can use this work for any purpose without restriction under copyright law.
Public Domain Mark (PDM) terms and conditions https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0
Credit: A country dance in a long hall; the elegance of the couple on the left contrasts with the ridiculous poses of the more rustic figures beyond representing "unidealized" humanity; straight, angular and round shapes. Engraving by William Hogarth, 1753. Wellcome Collection. Public Domain Mark

Selected images from this work


About this work

Publication/Creation

[London] : W. Hogarth, 5 March 1753.

Physical description

1 print : engraving, with etching ; image 36.8 x 49.5 cm.

Lettering

Analysis of beauty. plate II. Designed, engraved and published by Wm. Hogarth, 5th March 1753, according to act of Parliament.

Edition

Paulson state II.

References note

R. Paulson, Hogarth's graphic works, London 1989, 3rd edition, no. 196
British Museum Catalogue of political and personal satires, London 1877, vol. 3, no. 3226

Lettering note

Numbering within the print
Around the design are small numbered illustrations. The print is the second plate to Hogarth's treatise The analysis of beauty, London, 1753 and relates specifically to chapter XVII entitled "Of Action", in which he espouses a "variety of lines, chiefly serpentine". The S line can be observed in the outlines of the discarded three-cornered hats as well as in the bounding greyhound dog. The print illustrates Hogarth's notions about the movement and shape of the body, the variety of which can also be observed in the figures in the portraits on the wall: Henry VIII, Charles I, Edward VI, Duchess of Wharton and Queen Elizabeth I etc. "At the top, the extraordinary abstracted landscape and its impressionistic pendant are intended to illustrate the true gradations of aerial perspective and the disagreeable neglect of it " (Hogarth, exhibition catalogue by L. Gowing, 1972, p. 75)

Reference

Wellcome Library no. 38384i

Type/Technique

Languages

  • English

Subjects


Where to find it


Permanent link