BetaThis search tool is in development. Find out more.
Digital Images

Iris graminea L. Iridaceae Grass-leaved flag. Flower de Luce. Distribution: Central and Southern Europe. This is probably the Iris bulbosa minor sive angustifolia [the lesser bulbed or narrow-leaved Iris], Lesser bulbed Flower de luce of Parkinson (1640). He advised that the properties of all Flag Irises were more or less the same, but says there is no agreement about the properties of the bulbous kinds (such as this plant). Of the Flag Irises, Culpeper (1650) writes that the roots 'resist poison, help shortness of the breath, prove the terms [menstruation]

Dr Henry Oakeley

Available online

view Iris graminea L. Iridaceae Grass-leaved flag. Flower de Luce. Distribution: Central and Southern Europe. This is probably the Iris bulbosa minor sive angustifolia [the lesser bulbed or narrow-leaved Iris], Lesser bulbed Flower de luce of Parkinson (1640). He advised that the properties of all Flag Irises were more or less the same, but says there is no agreement about the properties of the bulbous kinds (such as this plant). Of the Flag Irises, Culpeper (1650) writes that the roots 'resist poison, help shortness of the breath, prove the terms [menstruation]
View

License

Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

You can use this work for any purpose, including commercial uses, without restriction under copyright law. You should also provide attribution to the original work, source and licence.

Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY 4.0) terms and conditions https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

Credit: Iris graminea L. Iridaceae Grass-leaved flag. Flower de Luce. Distribution: Central and Southern Europe. This is probably the Iris bulbosa minor sive angustifolia [the lesser bulbed or narrow-leaved Iris], Lesser bulbed Flower de luce of Parkinson (1640). He advised that the properties of all Flag Irises were more or less the same, but says there is no agreement about the properties of the bulbous kinds (such as this plant). Of the Flag Irises, Culpeper (1650) writes that the roots 'resist poison, help shortness of the breath, prove the terms [menstruation]. Credit: Dr Henry Oakeley. Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)


About this work

Description

the roots being green and bruised [crushed up] take away blackness and blewness of a stroke [ie a blow] being applied thereto.'. Photographed in the Medicinal Garden of the Royal College of Physicians, London.

Contributors



Identifiers


We’re improving the information on this page. Find out more.