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The garden of Eden illuminated by light symbolising the Trinity. Engraving by A. Collaert after H. Bol.

  • Bol, Hans, 1534-1593.
Reference
15483i
  • Pictures
  • Online

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view The garden of Eden illuminated by light symbolising the Trinity. Engraving by A. Collaert after H. Bol.

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Credit: The garden of Eden illuminated by light symbolising the Trinity. Engraving by A. Collaert after H. Bol. Wellcome Collection. Public Domain Mark

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About this work

Description

Bible. O.T. Genesis. 1-2. The Holy Spirit is depicted on the ground as it is what remains in the world after the Ascension. Except for the lion and the dog, the animals are shown in pairs

Publication/Creation

[Place of publication not identified] : Sadeler (Sadeler)

Physical description

1 print : line engraving and etching ; platemark 20.1 x 25.9 cm

Lettering

Invisibia Dei a creatura mundi per ea quae facta sunt intellectu conspiciuntur, sempiternaque eius virtus & divinitas. Rom. 1 ... Symbolum. Athanasii. et Nicenum ... Vera et christiana fides ... omnipotens Dominus ... In principio ... Rom. 2 ... H. Bol f. A.C. sculps. Sadeler autor et excudit

Creator/production credits

Sadeler is named as "autor": meaning that he selected the texts?

Lettering note

The quotation at the top is Romans 1.20. From the left to the right are: Genesis 1.1-2; Psalm 33.6; Matthew 28.19; Romans 2.7.
The Hebrew inscriptions, from top to bottom, are: "Yahweh", the sacred tetragrammaton, "devar", meaning "word", and "ruah elohim", meaning "the spirit of God".
The main text relates the symbolism within the picture to the Athanasian and Nicene creeds, both of which are Trinitarian forms developed around the time of the Council of Chalcedon in 451. They emphasise the "double succession" of spirit from both God the Father and the Son

Reference

Wellcome Library no. 15483i

Type/Technique

Languages

  • Latin


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