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An itinerant doctor, by a subterfuge, cures an undergraduate hoaxer of his supposed maladies of lying and bad memory. Coloured etching by T. Rowlandson, 1807, after G.M. Woodward.

Woodward, G. M. approximately 1760-1809.
Date
July 9 1807
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Credit: An itinerant doctor, by a subterfuge, cures an undergraduate hoaxer of his supposed maladies of lying and bad memory. Coloured etching by T. Rowlandson, 1807, after G.M. Woodward. Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

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About this work

Publication/Creation

London (111 Cheapside) : Pub. by T. Tegg, July 9 1807.

Physical description

1 print : etching and engraving, with watercolour ; platemark 27.5 x 21.6 cm

Lettering

A cure for lying and bad memory. A travelling empiric ... never forget the medicine! Woodward del. Rowlandson sc.

Reference

Wellcome Library no. 460130i

Lettering note

Lettering engraved below picture: "A travelling Empiric being in the neighbourhood of one of the Universities, gain'd great credit for his skill in medicine, in fact it was reported that he was capable of curing all diseases incident to the human frame. A College Wag, fond of exercisising [sic] his wit, sent for the renowned doctor, and after passing many encomiums on his great medical skill, told him he was troubled with two disorders which he fear'd went beyond his power to cure. Never fear replied the doctor, state the cases. Why Sir, in the first place, I have such an unfortunate bad memory that I never recollect what I have said a few minutes before, and the second is, truly shocking to relate, I have such a strong propensity to lying that I scarcely ever open my mouth but I commit myself. They are certainly very serious cases said the doctor, and require some consideration, however if you will call on me tomorrow, (bye the bye you had better write it down while it is in your memory.) I think I can work a cure. Sir, I am infinitely obliged to you, I will be sure to attend punctually, on which they exchanged vows and retir'd. The next day according to promise, the student waited on the doctor. Doctor, I am glad to see you. That's a lie! said the son of Galen, according to your own account of your unfortunate malady, but come it is time we proceed to business, are you prepared to take my medicine? Perfectly. That's another lie! But however I have not a doubt I shall perform a cure. Here John bring from the grand saloon, the gilded pill called Pillula Memoria, Anti Fibbibus!! There Sir, view it, what a beauty in appearance, come Sir, sit down, open your mouth, there Sir, it is gone! Now how do you find yourself? Find myself! Curse the fellow! He has poisened me! Why zounds, you have given me Asafoetida, or something worse! I have, I have! You are right! You speak the truth you are perfectly cured, Huzza! I told you I should manage it. And as to your memory don't trouble yourself about that, that cure follows of course, for I am sure you will never forget the medicine!"

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