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A forlorn looking child with arms outstretched among flowers, representing a child with AIDS ostracized for fear of transmitting the disease. Colour lithograph by J. Keeler, 1987, for the Centre for Attitudinal Healing.

Date
1987
Reference
667425i
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view A forlorn looking child with arms outstretched among flowers, representing a child with AIDS ostracized for fear of transmitting the disease. Colour lithograph by J. Keeler, 1987, for the Centre for Attitudinal Healing.
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Credit: A forlorn looking child with arms outstretched among flowers, representing a child with AIDS ostracized for fear of transmitting the disease. Colour lithograph by J. Keeler, 1987, for the Centre for Attitudinal Healing. Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)

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About this work

Publication/Creation

California (19 Main St., Tiburon, CA 94920) : Centre for Attitudinal Healing, 1987.

Physical description

1 print : lithograph, printed in colours ; sheet 37.8 x 27.8 cm

Lettering

I have AIDS please hug me. I can't make you sick. Aids Hot Line for Kids. Center for Attitudinal Healing. J. Keeler ©1987.

Notes

"One of the most recognized HIV/AIDS posters ever produced, this image of a child with outstretched arms accompanied by the message, "I have AIDS, please hug me, I can't make you sick," has become a worldwide icon in the fight against HIV/AIDS discrimination. Inspired by the experience of Ryan White, a 13-year old hemophiliac with AIDS who was barred from school in 1985 and became a symbol of the intolerance that is inflicted on AIDS victims, this reproduction of a child's drawing has a disarming quality that works closely with the textual message. This poster reflected the changed tone of the media coverage of AIDS following Ryan White's courageous battle, which helped shift focus from ignorance and discrimination to acceptance and newfound knowledge of the fatal disease. Designed to evoke compassion, the simple yet powerful message in the poster to the right from 1987 has subsequently inspired a variety of spin-offs used by international AIDS awareness and education programs."--Eric Boyle, 'Visual culture and public health posters: HIV/AIDS: Living with HIV/AIDS", website of the History of medicine Division, National Library of Medicine (accessed 2008)

Lettering note

Includes telephone number

Reference

Wellcome Library no. 667425i

Copyright note

J. Keeler AIDS Hotline For Kids J. Keeler ©1987 1987 11/08/2008 UkLW Transcription from the item

Type/Technique

Languages

  • English



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