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Examination of the newborn baby.

Nicholas, Simon C.
Date
1969
  • Film


About this work

Description

A partly-dramatised film produced for GPs about how to examine a newborn baby. A doctor is called out in the later stages of a normal home birth (the expectant father is left downstairs chain smoking with a tumbler of whisky). A consultant obstetrician at the Hammersmith Hospital shares his experience of examining new born babies; they should be examined twice, initially to rule out any life-threatening conditions and then later to identify any abnormalities. An initial examination is demonstrated on a new born male baby. A definitive examination is made about a week later with the mother present; the doctor carries out a home visit and another doctor follows the same procedure in hospital. A naked (and crying baby) is examined in detail (the presence of the mother is considered helpful). Examples of what to look are provided by footage and medical illustrations of various cases. Colour is important; problematic cynosis is illustrated. The identification of birthmarks is described. After the skin and body, the baby is exmained from head to foot from the mouth and palate,followed by the chest, the umblical cord, the anus, genitalia in boys and in girls and the feet. Vision and the eyes and the Moro reflex are studied to identify various abnormalities.

Publication/Creation

England, 1969.

Physical description

1 film reel (26 mins.) : sound; colour

Copyright note

Smith, Kline & French.

Notes

The original film copy was dusty and moldy before cleaning.
On the BFI's catalogue this film title is described as 'on restricted loan'.

Creator/production credits

Sponsored by Smith, Kline & French. Directed by Simon C. Nicholas. Made at the Hammersmith Hospital with the co-operation of the Institute of Child Health, University of London.

Type/Technique

Languages

  • English


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