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350 results filtered with: Red
  • Arabidopsis thaliana plant cells containing chloroplasts, LM
  • Eye development, zebrafish
  • Left and right brain functions, artwork
  • Animal flight muscle mitochondria
  • Neurone development, embryoid body
  • Papaver rhoeas L. Papaveraceae Corn Poppy, Flanders Poppy. Distribution: Temperate Old World. Dioscorides (Gunther, 1959) recommended five or six seed heads in wine to get a good night's sleep the leaves and seeds applied as a poultice to heal inflammation, and the decoction sprinkled on was soporiferous. Culpeper (1650) ' ... Syrup of Red, or Erratick Poppies: by many called Corn-Roses. ... Some are of the opinion that these Poppies are the coldest of all other - believe them that list [wishes to]: I know no danger in this syrup, so it be taken in moderation and bread immoderately taken hurts
  • Ovulation, artwork
  • Microvasculature of human head and brain
  • Glycinergic neurons in a zebrafish embryo
  • Goblet cells are packed full of mucous globules (blue), which they release to provide lubrication and protection to the inner surfaces of the intestine and the respiratory system among others. The mucous globules are condensed inside the goblet cell but expand hugely once they are released, absorbing water within 20 milliseconds. This rapid release occurs in response to lots of different stimuli and allows the mucous to get to work instantly.
  • Colour vision
  • Stomach from a neonatal dog, longitudinal section
  • Aucuba japonica 'Rosannie'
  • Prostate cancer cells treated with nano sized drug carriers
  • Punica granatum L. Lythraceae Pomegranate, granatum malum, balustines. Distribution: E. Mediterranean to Himalayas. The Pomegranate is in the centre of the Arms of the Royal College of Physicians, perhaps for its use in cooling, and therefore for fevers. However it was the sour pomegranate that would have been used as Dioscorides says the sweet ones are unfit for use in agues. Culpeper (1650) makes no mention of the fruit, but says of the flowers ‘... they stop fluxes and the Terms in women.’ In the Complete Herbal and English Physician (1826) he says the fruit ‘... has the same general qualities as other acid fruits.’ Of the flowers he says (among other properties) that ‘A strong infusion of these cures ulcers in the mouth and throat, and fastens loose teeth.’ Gerard (1633) says that the cravings of pregnant women can be abolished with the juice, and perhaps it was scurvy which was being treated effectively when he reports that the juice was very effective against splitting of blood and for loose teeth. The dwarf form of this species, Punica granatum var. nana has fruits no more than 3cm across. Pomegranate bark can only be sold by registered pharmacies in the UK and used to be used as a vermifuge, with the secondary use that the tincture made from it doubled as a permanent ink. In South Africa the fruit rind is used for diarrhoea and stomach ache, and the bark as a vermifuge, but undesirable side effects make this dangerous. It is reported to be effective against fevers, as a diuretic, to lower blood sugar and to be both antibacterial and antiviral (van Wyk, 2000). Photographed in the Medicinal Garden of the Royal College of Physicians, London.
  • Dividing HeLa cells, LM
  • Zinnia cultivar
  • Cosmos atrosanguineus 'Chocolate Drop'
  • Raynaud's Phenomenon
  • Vessels
  • Raynaud's Phenomenon
  • Cellular architecture of normal human skin imaged by whole mount tissue microscopy. Human skin has a rich network of white blood cells (specifically dendritic cells, T cells and macrophages) which form sheaths around blood vessels. In this image, blood vessels (string-like structures stained for CD31; red), lymphatic vessels (ribbon-like structures stained for LYVE-1; blue) and dendritic cells (stained for CD11c; green) can be seen. Macrophages (stained for LYVE-1; blue) are also present. This normal cellular architecture is grossly disrupted in diseased skin (see related images). X10 magnification. Scale bar (white) represents 200 micrometres.
  • Horse intestine with multiple attached parasitic worms
  • Tomato, sagittal view, MRI
  • Wild-type and Mutant Muscle Sarcomeres, Drosophila larva
  • ATP sysnthase fields
  • Multi-sized beads, fluorescence
  • Cellular architecture of normal human skin imaged by whole mount tissue microscopy. Human skin has a rich network of white blood cells (specifically dendritic cells, T cells and macrophages) which form sheaths around blood vessels (string-like structures). A network of lymphatic vessels (ribbon-like structures) is also present. In this image, human skin lymphatic vessels (stained for LYVE-1; blue) and white blood cells comprised of dendritic cells (stained for CD11c; green) and T cells (stained for CD3; red) can be seen. Some macrophages also express the protein LYVE-1 similar to lymphatic vessel cells which can be appreciated as blue cells within and in between the sheaths of white blood cells. This normal cellular architecture is grossly disrupted in diseased skin (see related images). X10 magnification. Scale bar (white) represents 200 micrometres.
  • Menstrual blood, artwork title "Fist"
  • Aedes aegypti mosquito crop