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30 results filtered with: Leucocyte
  • Cellular architecture of normal human skin imaged by whole mount tissue microscopy. Human skin has a rich network of white blood cells (specifically dendritic cells, T cells and macrophages) which form sheaths around blood vessels. In this image, T cells (stained for CD3; red) dendritic cells (stained for MHC class II; green) and macrophages (stained for LYVE-1; blue with some cells showing a tinge of green) can be seen. Cell nuclei have been stained with DAPI (grey). This normal cellular architecture is grossly disrupted in diseased skin (see related images). X10 magnification. Scale bar (white) represents 200 micrometres.
  • Blood vessel with red and white blood cells
  • Electron micrograph of blood clot,high power
  • Cellular architecture of normal human skin imaged by whole mount tissue microscopy. Human skin has a rich network of white blood cells (specifically dendritic cells, T cells and macrophages) which form sheaths around blood vessels. In this image, blood vessels (string-like structures stained for CD31; red), lymphatic vessels (ribbon-like structures stained for LYVE-1; blue) and dendritic cells (stained for CD11c; green) can be seen. Macrophages (stained for LYVE-1; blue) are also present. This normal cellular architecture is grossly disrupted in diseased skin (see related images). X10 magnification. Scale bar (white) represents 200 micrometres.
  • Cellular architecture of normal human skin imaged by whole mount tissue microscopy. Human skin has a rich network of white blood cells (specifically dendritic cells, T cells and macrophages) which form sheaths around blood vessels (string-like structures). A network of lymphatic vessels (ribbon-like structures) is also present. In this image, human skin lymphatic vessels (stained for LYVE-1; blue) and white blood cells comprised of dendritic cells (stained for CD11c; green) and T cells (stained for CD3; red) can be seen. Some macrophages also express the protein LYVE-1 similar to lymphatic vessel cells which can be appreciated as blue cells within and in between the sheaths of white blood cells. This normal cellular architecture is grossly disrupted in diseased skin (see related images). X10 magnification. Scale bar (white) represents 200 micrometres.
  • SEM of blood clot + one white corpuscle
  • Blood vessel in a melanoma, SEM
  • SEM of blood corpuscles in clot.
  • Macrophages infected with Candida yeast spores, SEM
  • Macrophages infected with candida yeast, LM
  • Cellular architecture of normal human skin imaged by whole mount tissue microscopy. Human skin has a rich network of white blood cells (specifically dendritic cells, T cells and macrophages) which form sheaths around blood vessels. This image was taken less than 20 micrometres beneath the junction that joins the dermal and epidermal layers of the skin (dermo-epidermal junction). At this level, dendritic cells (stained for CD11c; green) form clusters around and between blood capillary loops (stained for CD31; red). The blind-ended tips of initial lymphatic vessels are just visible (stained for LYVE-1; blue) at this level. This normal cellular architecture is grossly disrupted in diseased skin (see related images). Scale bar (white) represents 200 micrometres.
  • SEM of blood corpuscles in clot.
  • Cellular architecture of human skin lymphoma imaged by whole mount tissue microscopy. Normal human skin has a rich network of white blood cells (specifically dendritic cells, T cells and macrophages) which form sheaths around blood vessels. In diseased skin, such as in skin lymphoma as seen here, this normal architecture becomes distorted. In this image, lots of T cells (stained for CD3; red), dendritic cells (stained for CD11c; green) and macrophages (stained for LYVE-1; blue) have infiltrated the skin. X20 magnification. Scale bar (white) represents 100 micrometres.
  • Cellular architecture of normal human skin imaged by whole mount tissue microscopy. Human skin has a rich network of white blood cells (specifically dendritic cells, T cells and macrophages) which form sheaths around blood vessels. This image was taken directly beneath the junction that joins the dermal and epidermal layers of the skin (dermo-epidermal junction). At this level, the capillary network (stained for CD31; red) is visualised against a lawn of autofluorescent dermal papillae (finger-like projections of the dermis; green) scattered with dendritic cells (stained for CD11c; green) and macrophages (stained for LYVE-1; blue). This normal cellular architecture is grossly disrupted in diseased skin (see related images). Scale bar (white) represents 200 micrometres.
  • Ultrastructure inside a macrophage cell, TEM
  • Cellular architecture of normal human skin imaged by whole mount tissue microscopy. Human skin has a rich network of white blood cells (specifically dendritic cells, T cells and macrophages) which form sheaths around blood vessels. In this image, blood vessels (string-like structures stained for CD31; green), lymphatic vessels (ribbon-like structures stained for LYVE-1; blue) and T cells (stained for CD3; red) can be seen. T cells are only found around dermal blood vessels. Macrophages (stained for LYVE-1; blue) are also present. This normal cellular architecture is grossly disrupted in diseased skin (see related images). X10 magnification. Scale bar (white) represents 200 micrometres.
  • SEM of blood clot + one white corpuscle.
  • Cellular architecture of normal human skin imaged by whole mount tissue microscopy. Human skin has a rich network of white blood cells (specifically dendritic cells, T cells and macrophages) which form sheaths around blood vessels. In this image, T cells (stained for CD3; red) dendritic cells (stained for MHC class II; green) and macrophages (stained for LYVE-1; blue with some cells showing a tinge of green) can be seen. Cell nuclei have been stained with DAPI (grey). This normal cellular architecture is grossly disrupted in diseased skin (see related images). X20 magnification. Scale bar (white) represents 100 micrometres.
  • Macrophage infected with Candida yeast spores, TEM
  • SEM of blood corpuscles in clot.
  • Blood vessel in a melanoma, SEM
  • SEM of red blood corpuscles, close-up
  • Cell in laser beam, flow cytometry, illustration
  • Castration resistant prostate cancer, human tissue
  • Macrophages infected with Candida yeast spores, TEM
  • Macrophages infected with candida yeast, LM
  • Blood vessel with red and white blood cells
  • Cellular architecture of normal human skin imaged by whole mount tissue microscopy. Human skin has a rich network of white blood cells (specifically dendritic cells, T cells and macrophages) which form sheaths around blood vessels. This image was taken greater than 150 micrometres beneath the junction that joins the dermal and epidermal layers of the skin (dermo-epidermal junction). At this level, dendritic cells (stained for CD11c; green) and macrophages (stained for LYVE-1; blue) form clusters around blood vessels (stained for CD31; red). This normal cellular architecture is grossly disrupted in diseased skin (see related images). Scale bar (white) represents 100 micrometres.
  • SEM of blood corpuscles in clot.
  • TEM of leukocytes (white blood cell)