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92 results filtered with: Furnaces
  • Local people gathered in a Scottish smithy for food and drink. Etching by W. Lizars, 18--.
  • An alchemist stoking a furnace, surrounded by well dressed onlookers: a banquet takes place in the background. Etching by C. Murer, ca. 1600-1614.
  • Basil Valentine contemplates a chemical jar containing homunculi of a man and woman holding hands, and a child emanating from them (alchemical symbol of conception); he is suddenly visited by Sabine Stuart de Chevalier, who reveals that she has the key to his works and crowns him as the king of alchemists. Etching by J. Le Roy, ca. 1781, after Hostoul after Sabine Stuart de Chevalier.
  • An alchemist holding tongs at his furnace. Etching by J. Wagner after D. Maggiotto.
  • A monkey-alchemist pumps a bellows in a laboratory; alluding to the vanity of alchemy. Process print after J.P. Le Bas after D. Teniers the younger.
  • Two children wait nervously while an alchemist secretively concocts a mixture at his stove. Pen and wash drawing by G. Robinson.
  • Chemistry: plan and section of a blast furnace. Engraving by Mutlow, 1810, after J. Farey.
  • Chemistry: many types of furnace, kiln, and oven. Engraving by E. Krausse.
  • A surgery where all fantasy and follies are purged and good qualities are prescribed. Line engraving by E. de Boulonnois, 16--.
  • Glass: a mediaeval glass-maker at work beside his furnace. Coloured pencil drawing, [n.d., twentieth century], after a thirteenth century French manuscript illustration.
  • An alchemist at a furnace with a large 'receiver', with diagrams of alchemical apparatus. Woodcut, 1658.
  • Chemistry: details of ovens and equipment. Coloured engraving by W. Lowry, 1804, after D. Mushett.
  • Chemistry: vertical section of a furnace used in evaporation. Engraving by Mutlow, 1810, after J. Farey.
  • A human body is consumed by a furnace; a woman holds a small red limbless effigy bearing a crown; a man holds a sheaf, and another a stick; below, by another furnace, a green and red dragon face each other, poised for combat; representing a stage in the process of alchemy. Coloured etching, ca. 18th century.
  • Levante las defensas : Micoseptil, estimulante de las defensas orgánicas / Laboratorios Vieta-Plasencia, S.A.
  • Metals: a furnace and various implements used in smithing. Engraving by T. Jefferys.
  • A young alchemist works a bellows at his furnace. Etching by T. Major, 1755, after D. Teniers the younger.
  • Design for a general chemical laboratory, with the apparatus numbered. Etching by A.W. Warren, 1822, after C. Varley.
  • An monkey-alchemist pumps a bellows in a laboratory; alluding to the vanity of alchemy. Engraving by J.P. Le Bas after D. Teniers II.
  • The heads of women are reforged in a workshop by the sea; representing a brutal cure for the 'madness' of women. Line engraving by F. Campion, 1663.
  • Chemical engineering: detailed section of a furnace designed by William Strickland. Engraving by B. Tanner after W. Strickland.
  • A young alchemist works a bellows at his furnace. Etching by T. Major, 1755, after D. Teniers the younger.
  • An infant blowing bellows into a furnace; allegory of the role of N. Lefevre in chemistry. Etching (portrait) after R.M. Pariset, and etching (border) by J-G. Blanchon after himself.
  • William Allen, portrayed as an alchemist with several furnaces, the one which he stokes is labelled "Matter o'money". Coloured etching by T. Jones, 1827.
  • Chemistry: plan and section of two blast furnaces. Coloured engraving by W. Lowry, 1804, after D. Mushett.
  • A tea plantation in China: workers heat and dry the tea leaves. Coloured lithograph.
  • Chemistry: plan and section of a blast furnace. Engraving by Mutlow, 1810, after J. Farey.
  • Chemistry: plan and section of two blast furnaces. Coloured engraving by W. Lowry, 1804, after D. Mushett.
  • Engineering: a patent furnace with continuous solid-fuel feed. Coloured lithograph.
  • An alchemist using bellows at a furnace in his laboratory. Etching by T. Major, 1750, after D. Teniers the younger.