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24 results
  • Cellular architecture of normal human skin imaged by whole mount tissue microscopy. Human skin has a rich network of white blood cells (specifically dendritic cells, T cells and macrophages) which form sheaths around blood vessels. In this image, T cells (stained for CD3; red) dendritic cells (stained for MHC class II; green) and macrophages (stained for LYVE-1; blue with some cells showing a tinge of green) can be seen. Cell nuclei have been stained with DAPI (grey). This normal cellular architecture is grossly disrupted in diseased skin (see related images). X10 magnification. Scale bar (white) represents 200 micrometres.
  • Toxic shock syndrome toxin
  • Human macrophage rupturing after infection with Chlamydia
  • Staphylococcal enterotoxin A
  • Cellular architecture of normal human skin imaged by whole mount tissue microscopy. Human skin has a rich network of white blood cells (specifically dendritic cells, T cells and macrophages) which form sheaths around blood vessels. In this image, blood vessels (string-like structures stained for CD31; red), lymphatic vessels (ribbon-like structures stained for LYVE-1; blue) and dendritic cells (stained for CD11c; green) can be seen. Macrophages (stained for LYVE-1; blue) are also present. This normal cellular architecture is grossly disrupted in diseased skin (see related images). X10 magnification. Scale bar (white) represents 200 micrometres.
  • Cellular architecture of normal human skin imaged by whole mount tissue microscopy. Human skin has a rich network of white blood cells (specifically dendritic cells, T cells and macrophages) which form sheaths around blood vessels (string-like structures). A network of lymphatic vessels (ribbon-like structures) is also present. In this image, human skin lymphatic vessels (stained for LYVE-1; blue) and white blood cells comprised of dendritic cells (stained for CD11c; green) and T cells (stained for CD3; red) can be seen. Some macrophages also express the protein LYVE-1 similar to lymphatic vessel cells which can be appreciated as blue cells within and in between the sheaths of white blood cells. This normal cellular architecture is grossly disrupted in diseased skin (see related images). X10 magnification. Scale bar (white) represents 200 micrometres.
  • Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A1
  • Trichuris muris is a parasitic nematode affecting mice. Following ingestion, T. muris eggs hatch in the large intestine where they develop into adults. The anterior end of the worm burrows into the lining of the gut, leaving the posterior end protruding into the lumen of the gut. The worms mate in this orientation, and the resulting eggs are released in to the gut lumen and shed faecally.
  • Cells interacting to cause immune response
  • Cellular architecture of normal human skin imaged by whole mount tissue microscopy. Human skin has a rich network of white blood cells (specifically dendritic cells, T cells and macrophages) which form sheaths around blood vessels. This image was taken less than 20 micrometres beneath the junction that joins the dermal and epidermal layers of the skin (dermo-epidermal junction). At this level, dendritic cells (stained for CD11c; green) form clusters around and between blood capillary loops (stained for CD31; red). The blind-ended tips of initial lymphatic vessels are just visible (stained for LYVE-1; blue) at this level. This normal cellular architecture is grossly disrupted in diseased skin (see related images). Scale bar (white) represents 200 micrometres.
  • Cellular architecture of human skin lymphoma imaged by whole mount tissue microscopy. Normal human skin has a rich network of white blood cells (specifically dendritic cells, T cells and macrophages) which form sheaths around blood vessels. In diseased skin, such as in skin lymphoma as seen here, this normal architecture becomes distorted. In this image, lots of T cells (stained for CD3; red), dendritic cells (stained for CD11c; green) and macrophages (stained for LYVE-1; blue) have infiltrated the skin. X20 magnification. Scale bar (white) represents 100 micrometres.
  • TEM Jurkat T cell showing typical clumped heterochromatin.
  • Cellular architecture of normal human skin imaged by whole mount tissue microscopy. Human skin has a rich network of white blood cells (specifically dendritic cells, T cells and macrophages) which form sheaths around blood vessels. This image was taken directly beneath the junction that joins the dermal and epidermal layers of the skin (dermo-epidermal junction). At this level, the capillary network (stained for CD31; red) is visualised against a lawn of autofluorescent dermal papillae (finger-like projections of the dermis; green) scattered with dendritic cells (stained for CD11c; green) and macrophages (stained for LYVE-1; blue). This normal cellular architecture is grossly disrupted in diseased skin (see related images). Scale bar (white) represents 200 micrometres.
  • Cellular architecture of normal human skin imaged by whole mount tissue microscopy. Human skin has a rich network of white blood cells (specifically dendritic cells, T cells and macrophages) which form sheaths around blood vessels. In this image, blood vessels (string-like structures stained for CD31; green), lymphatic vessels (ribbon-like structures stained for LYVE-1; blue) and T cells (stained for CD3; red) can be seen. T cells are only found around dermal blood vessels. Macrophages (stained for LYVE-1; blue) are also present. This normal cellular architecture is grossly disrupted in diseased skin (see related images). X10 magnification. Scale bar (white) represents 200 micrometres.
  • Cellular architecture of normal human skin imaged by whole mount tissue microscopy. Human skin has a rich network of white blood cells (specifically dendritic cells, T cells and macrophages) which form sheaths around blood vessels. In this image, T cells (stained for CD3; red) dendritic cells (stained for MHC class II; green) and macrophages (stained for LYVE-1; blue with some cells showing a tinge of green) can be seen. Cell nuclei have been stained with DAPI (grey). This normal cellular architecture is grossly disrupted in diseased skin (see related images). X20 magnification. Scale bar (white) represents 100 micrometres.
  • Salmonella detection by human epithelial type-2 cell
  • TEM Jurkat T cell early apoptopsis
  • Multinucleated giant cell containing an asteroid, microscopy.
  • Eosinophil-derived neurotoxin
  • Schistosoma mansoni flatworm, male with female
  • Staphylococcal enterotoxin C2
  • Cellular architecture of normal human skin imaged by whole mount tissue microscopy. Human skin has a rich network of white blood cells (specifically dendritic cells, T cells and macrophages) which form sheaths around blood vessels. This image was taken greater than 150 micrometres beneath the junction that joins the dermal and epidermal layers of the skin (dermo-epidermal junction). At this level, dendritic cells (stained for CD11c; green) and macrophages (stained for LYVE-1; blue) form clusters around blood vessels (stained for CD31; red). This normal cellular architecture is grossly disrupted in diseased skin (see related images). Scale bar (white) represents 100 micrometres.
  • Dendritic cell interacting with a T cell
  • TEM of leukocytes (white blood cell)