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Reconstructed skull, repaired by titanium cranioplasty, Engl

Science Museum, London

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Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

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Credit: Reconstructed skull, repaired by titanium cranioplasty, Engl. Credit: Science Museum, London. Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)


About this work

Description

Cranioplasty is a surgical technique to repair damage to the skull caused by birth defect, illness or injury. Developed in the 1970s by George Blair, a dental surgeon, and Derek Gordon, a neurosurgeon, this method meant that repairs could be made which easily imitated the curves and shape of the skull, unlike previous methods which involved wiring and stitching. Moulds would be taken of the piece of skull to be repaired, from which a titanium plate is made. Titanium is a good material to use in this sort of surgery as it is extremely strong and durable, but also inert – so will not react with tissues and provoke an immune response. The bone plates and screws are also used to stabilise the skull. maker: Downs Surgical Limited Place made: Mitcham, Merton, Greater London, England, United Kingdom



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