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Acu-moxa chart: Infantile convulsions, Chinese MS, c. 1911

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Credit: Acu-moxa chart: Infantile convulsions, Chinese MS, c. 1911. Credit: Wellcome Collection. Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

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Description

The image is taken from a MS of unknown provenance and authorship, dating from c. 1911. On the right-hand side of the page (shown here), there are two depictions of the human body, one prone and one supine, showing the locations of the acupoints employed in treating acute infantile convulsions (ji jingfeng). To the left are two depictions showing the locations of the acupoints employed in treating chronic infantile convulsions (man jingfeng or tiandiaofeng).

Lettering

IMAGE TITLE: Dispersal technique where the child is delirious and does not recognise its own family. OTHER LETTERING: Yintang (Hall of Seals); cuanzhu (Gathered Bamboo); chengjiang (Receiving Fluids); rugen (Root of the Breast); youmen (Hidden Portal); dantian (Cinnabar Field); neihuai (internal malleolus); zhiyang (Reaching Yang); weiqi (acupoint); tianzhu (Celestial Pillar); fengchi (Wind Pool); gaohuang (Vital Region); changqiang (Long Strength); san li (Three Miles); gongsun (Grandparent and Grandchild); kunlun (Kunlun); hegu (Joining the Valley)

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