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Henry Brougham is praised by black ex-slaves for his part in their liberation, but criticized by children factory employees, on whom he turns his back. Lithograph by H.H. (Henry Heath).

  • Heath, Henry, active 1824-1850.
Date
Pub'd May 26th [1832?]
Reference
669498i
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view Henry Brougham is praised by black ex-slaves for his part in their liberation, but criticized by children factory employees, on whom he turns his back. Lithograph by H.H. (Henry Heath).

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Credit: Henry Brougham is praised by black ex-slaves for his part in their liberation, but criticized by children factory employees, on whom he turns his back. Lithograph by H.H. (Henry Heath). Wellcome Collection. Public Domain Mark

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About this work

Description

The ex-slaves are saying "Ah! Massa Bro'am! You be poor Negro best friend. We no like work; climate too hot, poor negro too fat - ha! ha! ha!". Brougham says "Poor unhappy negro! I have caused twenty millions of money , taken from the pockets of my fellow countrymen, to be spent in purchasing your freedom, but am woefully disappointed in its mis-application." The factory children are saying "Cruel Lord! to turn his back on us poor factory children."

"Throughout his life Brougham continued to speak out, in parliament and in public, against the evils of the slave trade and slavery, and he remained proud of his own contribution to the cause of the abolitionists" (Oxford dictionary of national biography). In the print, Brougham wears tartan trews: the ODNB says that in the 1830s "Many began to comment that the often dishevelled-looking Brougham was not entirely of sound mind. He began to sport tartan trousers, buying enough material to last for the rest of his life"

Publication/Creation

[London] (380, Strand) : W. Soffe, Pub'd May 26th [1832?] ([London] (22 Denmark St., Soho) : Lith. W. Kohler)

Physical description

1 print : lithograph ; image and border 27.4 x 37.2 cm.

Lettering

Slavery at home and abroad. HH

Creator/production credits

Bears vignette, lower right: a black man (or a chimney-sweep) cocking a snook

Lettering note

"End slavery at home and abroad" was a slogan used in the 1830s to remind people that the conditions of some factory workers in England were similar to those of the slaves before emancipation

Reference

Wellcome Library no. 669498i

Languages

  • English


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