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An itinerant surgeon extracting stones from a man's head; symbolising the expulsion of 'folly' (insanity) Line engraving after L. van Leyden.

Lucas, van Leyden, 1494-1533.

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view An itinerant surgeon extracting stones from a man's head; symbolising the expulsion of 'folly' (insanity) Line engraving after L. van Leyden.
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Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

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Credit: An itinerant surgeon extracting stones from a man's head; symbolising the expulsion of 'folly' (insanity) Line engraving after L. van Leyden. Credit: Wellcome Collection. Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)


About this work

Description

The images of a surgeon (often itinerant) making an incision in a patient's head in order to extract 'stones' (implying madness in the individual) do not represent an actual operation, but are allegorical scenes refering to the subduction of 'folly' (madness) from the body. See further: W. Schupbach, A new look at The cure of folly, Medical history, 1978, vol. 22, pp. 267-281

Lettering

Also inden nargonsche const nicmant is myns gelycke, hebbe daerom vanden key te snyden t'recht verstant, oock vanden hoost weruel te vinden soe goeden praetyke, hoest v nu ghy keyers om ghesneden te werden want, als ick en quamer noyt experter meester in lant.

Publication/Creation

[Amsterdam] : C[laes] J[ansz] V[isscher]

Physical description

1 print : line engraving

Reference

Wellcome Library no. 21081i

Language

  • Dutch


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