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A prophet points to a cross which is leaking water; representing faith, the 'fountain of life'. Etching by C. Murer after himself, c. 1600-1614.

Murer, Christoph, 1558-1614.
Date
1622

Available online

view A prophet points to a cross which is leaking water; representing faith, the 'fountain of life'. Etching by C. Murer after himself, c. 1600-1614.

License

Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
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Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY 4.0) terms and conditions https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
Credit: A prophet points to a cross which is leaking water; representing faith, the 'fountain of life'. Etching by C. Murer after himself, c. 1600-1614. Credit: Wellcome Collection. Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

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About this work

Description

This scene illustrates a speech in Murer's play on faith, hope and charity; the image specifically concerns faith. Below the main image of the prophet, a man puts his nose into the stream emanating from the fountain. Men in Roman and Arabic costume dig a hole on the right; they lower a bucket into it. Atop the leaking cross is a bird with a sprig, perhaps alluding to the harbinger of safety in the story of Noah The composition is similar to that of a print by Jan Sadeler after Christoph Schwarz, in which Fracastoro occupies the position of the prophet in Murer's print: Wellcome Library catalogue no. 524739i

Publication/Creation

Zurich : Johann Rudolf Wolf, 1622.

Physical description

1 print : etching.

Lettering

Fons vitae. CM.

Publications note

Thea Vignau-Wilberg, Christoph Murer und die "XL. Emblemata miscella nova", Bern : Benteli Verlag, 1982

Reference

Wellcome Library no. 26677i

Lettering note

This series was originally intended by Murer to serve as illustration to his play 'Edessa', but he died before completing it. The play concerned the politics surrounding the Arian controversy in the fourth century Christian church. In her book (cited below), T. Vignau-Wilberg demonstrates that Murer used the story of the persecutions in Edessa of non-Arians by Arians as a cipher for the persecution of Protestants by Catholics in his contemporary Europe. However, the play was never published and the etchings were published as emblems eight years after his death, with a different text written by Johann Heinrich Rordorf, sometimes at variance with the intention of the original

Languages

  • Latin



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