BetaThis search tool is in development. Find out more.
Pictures

A man performing a forward flip. Collotype after Eadweard Muybridge, 1887.

Muybridge, Eadweard, 1830-1904.
Date
1887

Available online

view A man performing a forward flip. Collotype after Eadweard Muybridge, 1887.
Download options

License

Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)
You can use this work for any purpose, as long as it is not primarily intended for or directed to commercial advantage or monetary compensation. You should also provide attribution to the original work, source and licence.
Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) terms and conditions https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
Credit: A man performing a forward flip. Collotype after Eadweard Muybridge, 1887. Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)

Selected images from this work


About this work

Publication/Creation

[Philadelphia] : [University of Pennsylvania], 1887 ([Philadelphia] : [The Photo-gravure Company], 1887)

Physical description

1 print : collotype ; image 20.5 x 37 cm.

Lettering

Animal locomotion. ... Copyright, 1887, by Eadweard Muybridge. All rights reserved.

Notes

One of 781 collotypes which form Eadweard Muybridge's magnum opus, Animal locomotion, 1887. This work originated in an attempt to settle the argument which arose in 1871 between Leland Stanford, president of the Central Pacific Railroad, and Robert Bonner, owner of a women's weekly magazine called The New York Ledger, as to whether a trotting horse ever had all four feet off the ground at once. Each man was prepared to enter the controversy fully and to contribute ideas and practical means to prove his side of the argument. Muybridge's solution was to photograph each stage in the trot of a horse called Occident owned by Stanford. Some of Muybridge's photographs did appear to show Occident with all four of his feet lifted at the same time clear of the ground. The research and photography for Animal Locomotion was carried out for the University of Pennsylvania in 1884-1885, using and improving the techniques developed in the 1870s. Of the 781 plates, 95 were devoted to the horse and 124 to other animals. The other 562 are devoted to men, women, and children, nude, semi-nude, and draped, walking, running, dancing, getting up and lying down, wrestling, boxing, leaping, etc. For further information see G. Hendricks, Eadweard Muybrige, London 1975, and R.B. Haas, Muybridge: man in motion, Berkeley 1976

Reference

Wellcome Library no. 27827i

Language

  • English


Permanent link


We’re improving the information on this page. Find out more.