Find thousands of books, manuscripts, visual materials and unpublished archives from our collections, many of them with free online access.

Artificial leg made by British prisoner-of-war, Germany, 194

Science Museum, London
  • Digital Images
  • Online

Available online

view Artificial leg made by British prisoner-of-war, Germany, 194

License

Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
You can use this work for any purpose, including commercial uses, without restriction under copyright law. You should also provide attribution to the original work, source and licence.
Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY 4.0) terms and conditions https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
Credit: Artificial leg made by British prisoner-of-war, Germany, 194. Credit: Science Museum, London. Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

Selected images from this work


About this work

Description

This artificial leg was reputedly made by a British prisoner of war (POW) in 1940, during the Second World War – he had been injured during the early months of the conflict. The main part of the leg is made from wood, which must have been scavenged from around the POW camp. It is a straight piece of wood without a knee joint so crutches may have been used as well. However, it would have greatly improved his mobility. Unlike artificial arms, which are barely equipped to recreate a fraction of the movements of a live arm, many of the basic functions of a leg – such as standing and walking – can be achieved with even the crudest of constructions. The cradle at the top of the leg is made from a military ‘jack boot’, which reaches above the knee. The maker or owner carved his initials, “A.B”, into the leg near the rubber tip at the bottom. maker: A B Place made: Germany


Permanent link


We’re improving the information on this page. Find out more.