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A human skeleton, seen from the front and leaning on a spade, surrounded by illustrations of individual bones. Engraving, 1686.

Blankaart, Steven, 1650-1702.
Date
[1686]

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view A human skeleton, seen from the front and leaning on a spade, surrounded by illustrations of individual bones. Engraving, 1686.
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License

Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

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Credit: A human skeleton, seen from the front and leaning on a spade, surrounded by illustrations of individual bones. Engraving, 1686. Credit: Wellcome Collection. Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)


About this work

Description

The following bones are illustrated, beginning at the top left and proceeding in a counter-clockwise direction: scapula (fig. 3); clavicle (collar-bone) (fig. 2); humerus, radius and ulna (bones of the arm) (fig. 4); the eight carpal bones of the wrist (fig. 5); bones of the foot (fig. 9); a portion of a human nail, as viewed under a microscope (fig. 11); the tibia and fibula (bones of the lower leg) (fig. 8); the femur (thigh bone), suspended by a string wrapped around the neck of the femur (fig. 7); the bones of the hip (fig. 6)

Publication/Creation

[Amsterdam] : [J. ten Hoorn], [1686]

Physical description

1 print : engraving ; image 14.5 x 8.2 cm

Reference

Wellcome Library no. 32187i

Reproduction note

The fiftieth of fifty-one plates first published in Steven Blankaart's De nieuw hervormde anatomie ofte ontleding des menschen lichaams, Amsterdam 1686, with a Latin edition the following year. The plates are made up of uncredited reduced copies of previously published illustrations, several to a page. In the notes to this plate in James Drake's Anthropologia nova (London 1707, 2 vols), where the Blankaart plates were published in an appendix to the first volume, the skeleton is described as: "Very ill copy'd after Vesalius, the rest from Veslingius". The skeleton first appeared as a wood-cut illustration to Andreas Vesalius's De humani corporis fabrica (Basel 1543), bk. i, p. 163

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