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An episode in 'Rookwood', a novel by W. Harrison Ainsworth: Luke Bradley, who is threatening Eleanor Mowbray with a dagger, is himself threatened by Ranulph Rookwood with a sword, but Ranulph is suddenly restrained by Dick Turpin. Line engraving by W. Greatbach after J. Cawse, 1837.

  • Cawse, John, 1779-1862.
Date
1837
Reference
42887i
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view An episode in 'Rookwood', a novel by W. Harrison Ainsworth: Luke Bradley, who is threatening Eleanor Mowbray with a dagger, is himself threatened by Ranulph Rookwood with a sword, but Ranulph is suddenly restrained by Dick Turpin. Line engraving by W. Greatbach after J. Cawse, 1837.

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Credit: An episode in 'Rookwood', a novel by W. Harrison Ainsworth: Luke Bradley, who is threatening Eleanor Mowbray with a dagger, is himself threatened by Ranulph Rookwood with a sword, but Ranulph is suddenly restrained by Dick Turpin. Line engraving by W. Greatbach after J. Cawse, 1837. Wellcome Collection. Public Domain Mark

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Description

An episode in William Harrison Ainsworth's Rookwood, 1834, chapter XLIX. Eleanor has fainted. In the right background is Handassah, Eleanor's maid and described as "a dark-faced gipsy", who has betrayed Eleanor to Luke. In the background are portraits of Sir Reginald Rookwood and his wife, to whom Luke's character is traced

'With one arm Luke enfolded Eleanor, with the other he uplifted the dagger. Its point was towards her bosom. Scowling grim defiance at Ranulph he exclaimed, in a determined tone "Advance a footstep, and my dagger descends into her heart." Ranulph hesitated, uncertain how to act; foaming with rage, yet trembling with apprehension. "Ranulph," gasped Eleanor. "Life without you were valueless -- advance — avenge me!" Ranulph still hesitated. He could not, by any act of his own, compromise Eleanor's safety. Luke saw his advantage, and was not slow to profit by it. "You seal her destruction if you stir," said he. "Villain," returned Ranulph, between his ground teeth, and with difficulty commanding sufficient coolness to speak with deliberation, "you perceive your power. Injure her, and nothing earthly shall protect you. Free her, and take your life and liberty ; nay, reward if you will-- you cannot otherwise escape me. "Escape you!" laughed Luke, disdainfully. "Stand aside, and let me pass. Beware," added he, sternly, "how you oppose me. I would not have a brother's blood upon my soul." "Nor I," cried Ranulph; "but you pass not." And he placed himself full in Luke's path. Luke, however, steadily moved forward, holding Eleanor between himself and Ranulph, so as to shield his own person ; but fancying he saw an opportunity of dealing a blow without injury to his mistress, the latter was about to hazard the thrust, when his arms were seized behind, and he was rendered powerless. " Lost, lost," groaned he; "she is lost to me for ever!" " I fear that's but too true," replied Turpin ; for it was the highwayman whose grasp confined Ranulph.'—Ainsworth, loc. cit.

Publication/Creation

London : Richard Bentley, 1837.

Physical description

1 print : line engraving, with etching ; image 9.8 x 7.8 cm

Lettering

Rookwood. Ranulph was about to hazard the thrust, when his arms were seized behind and he was rendered powerless. J. Cawse pinxt. W. Greatbach sculp.

Reference

Wellcome Library no. 42887i

Type/Technique

Languages

  • English
  • Latin


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