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Physiognomy diagnosis chart, Chinese woodcut, 1817


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Credit: Physiognomy diagnosis chart, Chinese woodcut, 1817. Credit: Wellcome Collection. Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

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Description

Physiognomy diagnosis chart, woodcut illustration from 1817 edition of Bian Que maishu nan jing (Canon of Problems in Bian Que's Book of the Pulse) by Xiong Qinghu (Qing period). Each sector of the face corresponds to an internal organ. Ting (Courtyard, i.e. the forehead) corresponds to the head; queshang (Above the Watch Towers) corresponds to the throat; quezhong (Between the Watch Towers) to the lungs; and xiaji (the lower pole), also called wang gong (the Royal Palace), corresponds to the heart. Zhixia (Lower Rectitude, corresponding to the liver, is flanked on left and right by sectors corresponding to the gall bladder,and below it lies the sector of the spleen. Fangshang (Upon the Square) corresponds to the stomach. The area from mianwang (Lord of the Face) upwards corresponds to the small intestine; around this is the area corresponding to the large intestine; and extending outwards from that is the area corresponding to the kidneys. By the kidneys is the sector corresponding to the navel. Below mianwang is the area corresponding to the bladder and genitalia.

Lettering

Image title: Zangfu mianbu tu (Chart of the facial sectors corresponding to the internal organs) Captions: Ting (courtyard); que (watch tower); guanzhong (middle of the pass); wang gong (royal palace); mian wang (lord of the face)

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