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Robert Peel as a pugilist attacking night watchmen with the intention of replacing them by the police force. Etching by Paul Pry (W. Heath).

Heath, William, 1795-1840
Date
May 26 1829

Available online

view Robert Peel as a pugilist attacking night watchmen with the intention of replacing them by the police force. Etching by Paul Pry (W. Heath).

License

Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
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Credit: Robert Peel as a pugilist attacking night watchmen with the intention of replacing them by the police force. Etching by Paul Pry (W. Heath). Credit: Wellcome Collection. Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

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About this work

Description

In the 1820s there were many different uncoordinated watchmen (many Irish) employed by the vestries with limited effectiveness in keeping the peace. In 1829 Peel as Home Secretary replaced them with a unified and more disciplined police force

Peel and Wellington are represented as Jerry Hawthorn and Corinthian Tom, young men about town in Regency London, introduced as fictitious characters by Pierce Egan in Life in London, London 1821. Among their adventures are scuffles with night watchmen. In the background is Lord Lyndhurst, Lord Chancellor holding an umbrella (the attribute of Bob Logic, one of Tom and Jerry's companions)

Publication/Creation

London (26 Haymarket) : T. McLean, May 26 1829

Physical description

1 print : etching ; platemark 26 x 38 cm

Lettering

A slap at the Charleys or a Tom & Jerry lark- vide new poliece bill.

Publications note

British Museum, Catalogue of political and personal satires, vol. XI, 1954, no. 15769

Reference

Wellcome Library no. 31630i

Lettering note

"Charley" was "the name formerly given to a night-watchman" (Oxford English dictionary). The night-watchmen are saying "oh murther its mancipation were gettin now aney how", identifying them as Irish Catholics. Wellington is saying "'Go it Bob", referring to Robert Peel

Creator/production credits

Authorship identified by a small figure of Paul Pry "Esq." in bottom left corner

Type/Technique

Languages

  • English



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