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Asymmetric cell division in a live zebrafish embryo.

Alexandre, Paula.
Date
2015
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Credit: Asymmetric cell division in a live zebrafish embryo. Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

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Time-lapse confocal microscopy of asymmetric cell division in the brain of a live zebrafish embryo. This image sequence shows a single neural progenitor (a cell which can divide and differentiate into a limited number of neural cell types) dividing to produce two daughter cells. The sequence starts at the 8 o'clock position on a clock face with the two daughter cells sitting side by side on the inner circumference of the circle. The sequence continues clockwise with the two daughter cells separating and moving apart. One is a neurone (white; outer-most cell) and the other a progenitor cell (inner-most cell) which itself will go on to divide. Cell nuclei (purple) and cell membranes (green) are visible. This asymmetric mode of cell division allows simultaneous production of both neurones and neural progenitors which are essential for controlling brain growth and differentiation. Time-lapse confocal microscopy of asymmetric cell division in the brain of a live zebrafish embryo. This image sequence shows a single neural progenitor (a cell which can divide and differentiate into a limited number of neural cell types) dividing to produce two daughter cells. The sequence starts at the 8 o'clock position on a clock face with the two daughter cells sitting side by side on the inner circumference of the circle. The sequence continues clockwise with the two daughter cells separating and moving apart. One is a neurone (white; outer-most cell) and the other a progenitor cell (inner-most cell) which itself will go on to divide. Cell nuclei (purple) and cell membranes (green) are visible. This asymmetric mode of cell division allows simultaneous production of both neurones and neural progenitors which are essential for controlling brain growth and differentiation.

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2015.

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