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A mountain, representing the battle of Mons (Bergen), giving birth to a mouse (representing the French army) which is killed by a man representing the Grand Alliance. Etching attributed to A. Allard, 1709.

Allard, Abraham, 1676?-1725.
Date
[1709]
  • Pictures


About this work

Description

The mountain (A) is labelled "Bergen Mons". Left a midwife holding forceps (1, "Vroedvrow, Sage femme") and a man-midwife holding a hook (3, "Vroedmeester, Docteur de la sage femme") with (right) his assistant (5, "Vroedmeesters assistent"), holding a paper referring to the Duc de Bouflers. The mouse (2) is labelled "Franse macht", and the man attacking it (4) is a soldier of the Alliance ("Krygsman der Geallierde")

Based on the fable of the mountain in labour by Aesop and on the verse derived from it ("Parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus"), in the Ars poetica by Horace (Q. Horatius Flaccus), v. 139

Publication/Creation

A St. Gilain : chez L. Forceur de Lignes, [1709]

Physical description

1 print : etching, with engraving ; platemark 26.9 x 17.4 cm

Lettering

De Franse bergen hebbe gebaard en een bespotlijk muisje beschaard. Ik (3) heb mijn maagdom daark voorheen by heb gezwore(n) Les monts ont accouché et ont produit une souris pour la France. ... Tot causera la paix ou le soleil couchant.

Publications note

F. Muller, De nederlandsche geschiedenis in platen, part 2, Amsterdam: Frederik Muller, 1870, p. 52, no. 3190
Not found in: British Museum, Catalogue of political and personal satires

Reference

Wellcome Library no. 2139917i

Lettering note

Translation of lettering: The mountain has given birth and a ridiculous mouse is produced
Bears number: 6
Extensive engraved text, first in Dutch and then in French translation. Engraved text around the figures represents words spoken by them

Creator/production credits

According to the Rijksmuseum online catalogue, this work can be attributed to Abraham Allard as printmaker

Languages

  • Dutch
  • French


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