BetaThis search tool is in development. Find out more.
Digital Images

Silver tongue scraper, London, England, 1827

Science Museum, London

Available online

view Silver tongue scraper, London, England, 1827
View

License

Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

You can use this work for any purpose, including commercial uses, without restriction under copyright law. You should also provide attribution to the original work, source and licence.

Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY 4.0) terms and conditions https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

Credit: Silver tongue scraper, London, England, 1827. Credit: Science Museum, London. Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)


About this work

Description

Tongue scrapers were used to remove the ‘furry’ deposits that can build up on the tongue after eating, drinking and smoking. This particular type was known as a ‘wishbone’ because of its shape. They symbolise a growing interest in oral healthcare and would be used either during a visit to the dentist or in the home. Scrapers could be made from a range of materials including ivory, tortoiseshell, gold and silver. Silver scrapers generally came into use after 1800. maker: Knight II, William or King, William Place made: London, Greater London, England, United Kingdom



Identifiers


We’re improving the information on this page. Find out more.