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The burning of Sir John Cobham, Lord Oldcastle, a Lollard and follower of John Wycliffe, in London in 1417. Wood engraving.

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43472i
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view The burning of Sir John Cobham, Lord Oldcastle, a Lollard and follower of John Wycliffe, in London in 1417. Wood engraving.

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Credit: The burning of Sir John Cobham, Lord Oldcastle, a Lollard and follower of John Wycliffe, in London in 1417. Wood engraving. Wellcome Collection. Public Domain Mark

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Description

The name Lollards was given to the followers of Wycliffe and the first reformers of the Roman Catholic religion in England. The sect is said to have been founded by Walter Lollard, who was burnt for heresy at Cologne in 1322. The Lollards anticipated Luther by replacing the clerical trappings of external observances with the inwardness and independent-mindedness of personal salvation. The first Lollard martyr in England was William Sawtree who was burnt alive in 1401. Sir John Cobham was accused of treason and condemned in 1413. He escaped to Wales, where he was captured and brought to London and burnt on 14 December 1417. Lollard's tower, part of bishop's prison, was near St. Paul's

Physical description

1 print : wood engraving ; image 10.7 x 18 cm

Lettering

Burning of Lord Cobham

Lettering note

Bears number bottom right : page 532

Reference

Wellcome Library no. 43472i

Type/Technique

Languages

  • English


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