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The wounding of Lord Robert Manners on the Resolution, at the battle of Dominica. Engraving by J.K. Sherwin and C. Sherwin, 1786, after T. Stothard.

  • Stothard, Thomas, 1755-1834.
Date
August 15th 1786
Reference
548033i
  • Pictures
  • Online

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view The wounding of Lord Robert Manners on the Resolution, at the battle of Dominica. Engraving by J.K. Sherwin and C. Sherwin, 1786, after T. Stothard.

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Credit: The wounding of Lord Robert Manners on the Resolution, at the battle of Dominica. Engraving by J.K. Sherwin and C. Sherwin, 1786, after T. Stothard. Wellcome Collection. Public Domain Mark

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About this work

Description

According to the Dictionary of National Biography, Manners did not die on the Resolution during the battle, but some days later on the Andromache bound for England, having developed lockjaw (tetanus) as a result of his wounds

Publication/Creation

London (no. 39 Fleet Street) : T. Macklin, August 15th 1786.

Physical description

1 print : engraving ; platemark 49.2 x 61 cm

Lettering

The death of Lord Robert Manners ... From the original picture painted by Stothard, in the possession of His Grace the Duke of Rutland. Engraved by J.K. Sherwin, Historical Engraver to His Majesty, & to His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales; and Charles Sherwin, Engraver to His Majesty

Lettering note

Lettering continues: "who greatly fell, when commanding the Resolution of 74 guns, in that ever memorable action fought in the West Indies, on the 12th of April 1782, under the command of St George Rodney; wherein the French lost 8 of their capital ships, one of which was the Ville de Paris of 110 guns with their admiral the Count de Grasse on board. The action lasted from 7 in the morning till 7 in the evening. The noble and gallant youth in the heat of action received an 18 pound shot thorugh both his legs, & had his right arm broke by a splinter from the ship's side at the same instant. Thus fell the son of the Marquis of Granby universally regretted by the nation as well as the navy. To the officers and seamen of the British Navy this print is most humbly dedicated by their obedient servant Thomas Macklin."

Reference

Wellcome Library no. 548033i

Languages

  • English


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