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Eugenics : a very short introduction / Philippa Levine.

  • Levine, Philippa
Date
[2017]
  • Books

About this work

Description

In 1883, Francis Galton, a cousin of Charles Darwin, coined the word "eugenics" to express his dream of perfecting the human race by applying the laws of genetic heredity. Adapting Darwin's theory of evolution to human society, eugenics soon became a powerful, international movement, committed to using the principles of heredity and statistics to encourage healthy and discourage unhealthy reproduction. Early in the twentieth century and across the world, doctors, social reformers, and politicians turned to the new science of eugenics as a means to improve and strengthen their populations. Eugenics advocates claimed their methods would result in healthier, fitter babies and would dramatically limit human suffering. The reality was a different story. In the name of scientific progress and of human improvement, eugenicists targeted the weak and the sick, triggering coercive legislation on issues as disparate as race, gender, immigration, euthanasia, abortion, sterilization, intelligence, mental illness, and disease control. Nationalists eagerly embraced eugenics as a means to legitimize their countries' superiority and racialized assumptions, and the Nazis notoriously used eugenics to shape their "final solution."

Publication/Creation

New York, NY : Oxford University Press, [2017]

Physical description

150 pages ; 18 cm.

Bibliographic information

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Contents

The world of eugenics -- Eugenic intelligence -- Eugenic reproduction -- The inequalities of eugenics -- Eugenics after 1945.

Type/Technique

Languages

  • English


Where to find it

  • LocationStatus
    History of Medicine
    JL.AM
    Open shelves

Permanent link


Identifiers

ISBN

  • 9780199385904
  • 0199385904