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Xanthorhiza simplicissima Marshall Ranunculaceae. Yellow root. Distribution: North America, where it was discovered by the plant collector and explorer William Bartram in 1773. Yellow-root. Austin (2004) reports that of the Native Americans, the Cherokee use the crushed plant to make a yellow dye

  • Dr Henry Oakeley
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view Xanthorhiza simplicissima Marshall Ranunculaceae. Yellow root. Distribution: North America, where it was discovered by the plant collector and explorer William Bartram in 1773. Yellow-root. Austin (2004) reports that of the Native Americans, the Cherokee use the crushed plant to make a yellow dye

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Credit: Xanthorhiza simplicissima Marshall Ranunculaceae. Yellow root. Distribution: North America, where it was discovered by the plant collector and explorer William Bartram in 1773. Yellow-root. Austin (2004) reports that of the Native Americans, the Cherokee use the crushed plant to make a yellow dye. Dr Henry Oakeley. Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

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a decoction of the root cramps, blood tonic, to treat cancer, piles, sore eyes and for a sore throat The Catawba use it for colds, stomach ulcers, jaundice. The root is poisonous if 'too much' is taken. It was used as a 'bitters' in American drinks in the early 20th century. Genus name from the Greek, xanthos, for 'yellow', rhiza for 'root'. Photographed in the Medicinal Garden of the Royal College of Physicians, London.

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