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A barber dressing a man's hair in a barber's shop at Richmond, Virginia; another man reads 'The New York Herald' while he awaits his turn. Wood engraving after E. Crowe.

  • Crowe, Eyre, 1824-1910.
Date
[1861]
Reference
29959i
  • Pictures
  • Online

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view A barber dressing a man's hair in a barber's shop at Richmond, Virginia; another man reads 'The New York Herald' while he awaits his turn. Wood engraving after E. Crowe.

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Credit: A barber dressing a man's hair in a barber's shop at Richmond, Virginia; another man reads 'The New York Herald' while he awaits his turn. Wood engraving after E. Crowe. Wellcome Collection. Public Domain Mark

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About this work

Description

The barber is black, the customers are white. "Another picture which we engrave in our present Issue is of a widely different character--Eyre Crowe's "Barber's shop at Richmond, Virginia" (260). Without putting forth high pretensions as a work of art it is, from the nature of its subject, invested with a local interest at the present moment which will recommend it to the attention of many of our travelled readers."— Illustrated London news, op. cit., p. 216

Publication/Creation

[London] : [Illustrated London news], [1861]

Physical description

1 print : wood engraving ; image 16 x 23.7 cm

Lettering

"A barber's shop at Richmond, Virginia," by Eyre Crowe, in the exhibition of the British Institution. - see page 216.

Creator/production credits

"... Crowe was engaged by Thackeray as his secretary and as drawing-master for his daughters. After preparing The hstory of Henry Esmond Esquire for publication Crowe was persuaded to accompany the author on a six-month (November 1852 to April 1853) lecture tour of the United States as his 'factotum and amanuensis' (Crowe, With Thackeray in America, 1). He did not always prove competent in this capacity but Thackeray appreciated his company as 'the kindest and most affectionate henchman ever man had' (Letters and private papers, 3.184). Crowe's American sketches, some of which appeared in the Illustrated London news, show a strong interest in the appearance and condition of the black community, later expressed in the painting Slaves waiting for sale, Richmond, Virginia (exh. RA, 1861; Heinz Collection)."--Oxford dictionary of national biography

Reference

Wellcome Library no. 29959i

Type/Technique

Languages

  • English


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