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Glass ampoule of liquid chloroform, Paris, France, 1845-1945

Science Museum, London

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Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

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Credit: Glass ampoule of liquid chloroform, Paris, France, 1845-1945. Credit: Science Museum, London. Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)


About this work

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Chloroform was used as an anaesthetic from the late 1840s until the 1950s. Liquid chloroform was dropped on to a face mask or vaporised and inhaled by the patient through a face mask. The chloroform was prepared by a Parisian pharmacist, A Vicario. Once the potentially toxic nature of this anaesthetic had become apparent, it was used far more cautiously. The vial was owned by Sir James Cantlie (1851-1926), a surgeon and medical administrator whose prestigious career included a leading role in setting up the London School of Tropical Medicine and the provision and training of ambulance services during the First World War. maker: Vicario, A Place made: Paris, Ville de Paris, Île-de-France, France



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