BetaThis search tool is in development. Find out more.
Find thousands of books, manuscripts, visual materials and unpublished archives from our collections, many of them with free online access.
Pictures

Henare Taratoa: a chief of the Ngai Te Rangi tribe, in the heroic act of getting water for the British wounded at the battle of Gate Pa, a Maori victory in the Waikato War, 28 April 1864. Watercolour by H.G. Robley, 1864.

Robley, Horatio Gordon, 1840-
Date
28 April 1864

Available online

view Henare Taratoa: a chief of the Ngai Te Rangi tribe, in the heroic act of getting water for the British wounded at the battle of Gate Pa, a Maori victory in the Waikato War, 28 April 1864. Watercolour by H.G. Robley, 1864.

License

Public Domain Mark
You can use this work for any purpose without restriction under copyright law.
Public Domain Mark (PDM) terms and conditions https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0
Credit: Henare Taratoa: a chief of the Ngai Te Rangi tribe, in the heroic act of getting water for the British wounded at the battle of Gate Pa, a Maori victory in the Waikato War, 28 April 1864. Watercolour by H.G. Robley, 1864. Credit: Wellcome Collection. Public Domain Mark

Selected images from this work


About this work

Publication/Creation

[Place of publication not identified], 28 April 1864.

Physical description

1 painting : watercolour ; sheet 21.9 x 18.4 cm

Lettering

Henare Taratoa (Flag at the Gate Pa) 28 April 1864.

Reference

Wellcome Library no. 527803i

Lettering note

Lettering continues: Henare Taratoa, a chief of the Ngaiterangi tribe, had been a pupil of Bishop Selwyn, at St John's College, Auckland. In 1864 when war broke out, he joined his people, and was a defender of the Gate Pa [view of palisade and the flagstaff in rear of work) 28th April 1864. He drew up the humane order for the protection of unarmed, or wounded men and the respectful treatment of the dead. This is commemorated on a monument in Tauranga cemetery (he was killed 21 June 64) The windows presented to the chapel of Lichfield Cathedral by officers and men who had served in the war all represent military scenes from the Old and New Testaments - one medallion has a special meaning depicting David in the act of pouring out the longed for water of Bethlehem; procured for him by three of his mighty men, at the risk of their lives 2.Samuel XXIII, 16 - and is meant to commemorate the similar heroic act of this Maori getting water for our wounded 29th April 1864 - Life of G. A. Selwyn, Bishop of New Zealand and Lichfield. Flag has white cross, new moon, 5 points star - on red.
Bears number: 3
Bears drawing of flag on verso

Type/Technique

Languages

  • English



Permanent link


We’re improving the information on this page. Find out more.