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Anatomy of the bladder in ancient Chinese medicine, woodcut

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Credit: Anatomy of the bladder in ancient Chinese medicine, woodcut. Wellcome Collection. Public Domain Mark

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Description

Woodcut illustration from an edition of 1537 (16th year of Jiajing reign period of Ming dynasty). The bladder is one of the six fu viscera. It is located in the lower abdomen. Being the place where liquids collect, or the fu organ of bodily fluids, it was described as the 'district capital administrator' (zhoudu zhi guan). Zhenjiu juying, Vol. 1 states: 'The bladder weighs 9 liang (Chinese oz., c. 50 gr) 2 zhu (O.1 liang). It measures 9 cun (Chinese inches) vertically. It is located below the kidneys, beside the large intestine.'

Lettering

Picture title: Pangguang zang (the bladder, a zang organ). Other lettering: Above is the small intestine; bladder; below it connects with the external genitalia (qianyin)

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