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16 results filtered with: Thirst
  • An angel gives Elijah cake and water. Line engraving by W. Panneels after P.P. Rubens.
  • James Scott, Australian medical student lost in the Himalayas for forty-three days without food, drinking from a snowball to rehydrate in the afternoon sun. Drawing by M. H. Boscott, 1993.
  • An angel rescues Hagar and Ishmael in the wilderness. Etching by E. Rooker after C. Le Brun.
  • Hagar and Ishmael saved by an angel. Coloured mezzotint by R. Dunkarton, 1798, after J.S. Copley.
  • God and two cherubs make water flow from the ass's jaw that Samson has used to kill the Philistines. Etching by B. Audran after F. Verdier, 1698.
  • In front of a grand palace, Moses draws water from a rock. Etching by J. Le Pautre.
  • Moses draws water from the rock, and the Israelites quench their thirst. Etching by J. Le Pautre.
  • Moses strikes a rock and water pours forth in abundance. Etching after F. Sigrist.
  • Samson stands over vanquished Philistines, a lion's pelt over his shoulders and his ass's jaw at his feet. Autotype after F.J. Shields, 1877.
  • Ceres, at night, drinking from a flask provided by an old woman, while her young son mocks. Etching by W. Hollar, 1646, after A. Elsheimer.
  • An angel saves a thirsting Elijah. Engraving by A. Zucchi, c. 1720, after S. Manaigo after G. Porta, il Salviati.
  • One of the seven Acts of Mercy: Give drink to the thirsty. Line engraving by S. Bourdon after himself.
  • Ceres, at night, drinking from a flask provided by an old woman, while her young son mocks. Etching by W. Hollar, 1646, after A. Elsheimer.
  • James Scott, Australian medical student, lost in the Himalayas for forty-three days without food. Drawing by Martin Howard Boscott, 1993.
  • Abraham's servant is impressed by the beautiful Rebecca, who stands in white amid the women around the well. Engraving by P.-I. Drevet after N. Coypel.
  • Moses brings forth water with his rod; his people gather the manna dropped from heaven and carry it away. Engraving by G. Bonasone after G.F.M. Mazzola, il Parmigianino, 1546.