Nature Wanders: A Smellwalk

Walking tour

Ticketed

This event includes British Sign Language provision.

Wednesday 5 July 2017

15:00-16:30

Please note that this event starts offsite. Further information about the meeting point will be provided when you book a ticket.

Nature is sometimes seen as rural and remote, but what beautiful, wild, surprising or mundane natural things might city dwellers find closer to home? Join us for a series of walks that will take a fresh look at what nature means.

Smellwalking (walking ‘nose-first’) proposes a knowledge of the world that counters the visual hegemony. We breathe 24,000 times a day, surrounded by smells but paying only scant attention. This walk is your chance to discover the natural environments between Brunswick Square Gardens and Wellcome Collection nose-first. Join us to put your nose to work and think about what this might mean for our relationship with the world around us. This walk will draw attention to the smells of ‘nature’ in London, from designed gardens to tiny planters at tree bases to the natural materials used in the construction of the city.

Kate McLean is a British artist, designer and mapper of urban smellscapes who is Programme Director for Graphic Design at Canterbury Christ Church University. She is a PhD candidate at the Royal College of Art, researching fine-grained, human-centred olfactory perceptions of cities worldwide and the methods by which this information can be rendered visible. She runs smellscape-mapping workshops, leads smellwalks around the world and co-edited the book, Designing with Smell: Practices, Techniques and Challenges.

This walk is suitable for all fitness levels. Please get in touch if you have any accessibility queries.

This event is FREE. Tickets will become available below from 11.00 on Friday 30 June.

This event will be British Sign Language interpreted. To book a place with a view of the interpreter or for more information, please email us at access@wellcomecollection.org or call 020 7611 2222.

Find out more about accessibility at Wellcome Collection.

(Image credit: Leah Barfield, 2017)