Screensaver Series

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Past
  • Free
  • Performance
  • Relaxed
Dancers wearing colourful floral clothing creating shapes as they move together. Performing in a studio with a black backdrop and wooden floors.
Screensaver, Janine Harrington 2019. © Image by Roswitha Chesher.

Grab a seat or a cushion and watch this dance performance created by Janine Harrington. The dancers’ kaleidoscopic movements evoke the patterns and continuous activity of a screensaver. You can tune in and out and move around the space to get a different perspective. The sounds that you hear will be generated live by Jamie Forth in response to the dancers’ movements.

Dates

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Past
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Past
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Need to know

Location

We’ll be in the Forum. To get there, take the lift or stairs up to level 1 and then follow the signs through the ‘Being Human’ gallery.

Place not guaranteed

Booking a ticket for a free event does not guarantee you a place. You should aim to arrive 15 minutes before the event is scheduled to start to claim your place. If you do not arrive on time, your place may be given to someone on the waiting list.

If you have any queries about accessibility, please email us at access@wellcomecollection.org or call 0 2 0. 7 6 1 1. 2 2 2 2

Our event terms and conditions

About your contributors

Janine Harrington

Artist

Janine Harrington is a choreographer, performer and writer born in Canterbury, UK. She holds an MA (Book Arts) from University of the Arts, London (2011) and a BA (Hons) in Dance Theatre from Laban (2006). Janine is interested in game structures, play, access, neurodiversity and the poetics of movement practices. Her recent work, the kaleidoscopic Screensaver Series (premiered at Dance Umbrella, 2018) foregrounds these interests and is currently touring.

Head and shoulders photograph of a man with glasses, a beard and shoulder-length dark hair.

Jamie Forth

Musician

Jamie Forth makes art using code, and is interested in how software shapes our lives and how it might do so in more positive and inclusive ways. Jamie studied music and electroacoustic composition at City University of London, and has a PhD in computer science from Goldsmiths, where he is also a lecturer in Creative Computing.